Tuesday, February 19, 2008

Suicide in Mid-Life

Buried deep in the New York Time's article is the possible cause:

At the moment, the prime suspect is the skyrocketing use — and abuse — of prescription drugs. During the same five-year period included in the study, there was a staggering increase in the total number of drug overdoses, both intentional and accidental, like the one that recently killed the 28-year-old actor Heath Ledger. Illicit drugs also increase risky behaviors, C.D.C. officials point out, noting that users’ rates of suicide can be 15 to 25 times as great as the general population.
This seems plausible to me. There really isn't any understanding of how the meds affect people going on and off of them and mixing them. And then there is the fact that the Boomers may have the most difficult time with aging of any generation.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Melissa, could you explain yourself when you say, "And then there is the fact that the Boomers may have the most difficult time with aging of any generation." Thanks!

Melissa Clouthier said...

Well, that's a generalization that I base on a couple things: the increase in plastic surgery, the idea of glorifying youth, adventure travel, pining for Woodstock, increased mediation use for depression, etc.

Perhaps the post WWII generation has an easier time with aging (actually lower suicide rates) because they're just grateful to be alive. The Boomers seem to be viewing aging as a terrible loss.

All these are just theories.

Anonymous said...

I see where you are coming from. I would have to agree with you. It takes great maturity to grow as a human without suffering. Most people seem to somehow find themselves during or after a great deal of suffering. Nowadays, there is such an abundance of everything, available so readily, that even the poorest among us have a lot. When you hit middle age, the question does arise, "Is that it?" "There has to be more to life", etc...

Personally, I worry about the hormone changes...which brings mood changes, which bring all kinds of added problems. If you run across some good information on that, I would love to read it.

Anonymous said...

"And then there is the fact that the Boomers may have the most difficult time with aging of any generation."

As a late-period Boomer (which should give me a transition blend of Boomer & Gen-X psychology), I'm kind of bummed out by aging (currently 52), but I really don't see any way around it. I was a kid genius and otherwise-late bloomer who is now internally where a true Gen-Xer would be around 30. I wish I'd been able to grow up sooner so I had more time for my adult life.

carol said...

I know this is not at all scientific but it's troubling that so many people, especially the young, are given so many different meds willy-nilly. I don't think the medical establishment can manage all the ramifications as well as they think they can.

That's why I'm Rx-free at 59.

Anonymous said...

Carol, the other Dr. Clouthier has a post up called, "Psychiatry is a modern nightmare." Check out that clip and some of the other clips that are on that screen and you see just how right you are. And you are right, meds in general are just not good for our kids to be on, especially when mixed. They do have their place and I'm always glad we have medication when it is really needed. They are, however, so very overused.

Anon.3:13 - just look at it from another stand point. So much of "aging" has to do with the mentality that goes along with it. If internally you feel like a 30 year old, you will have all kinds of zest yet for life. Good for you and take advantage of that youthful spirit that you have!

sandy said...

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