Friday, November 30, 2007

Best Books 2007 & Other Books, Too

For those who are interested, here's the New York Time's List of Best Books for 2007. Haven't read a one of them. I just don't have much time for fiction. I'm rereading Lord of the Rings right now, just because it's enjoyable after a long day.

A book I recently read was The Year of Living Biblically. It's excellent and I highly recommend it for anyone across the faith spectrum.

I'm still slogging through the works of G.K. Chesterton. His books cause profound bouts of reflection which slows things down.

I also read the book How to Read Literature Like a Professor. My lit prof in college was not the best, and I didn't pay much attention to the material anyway (he made terrific stuff bland) and I thought I'd go back to the basics. This book is excellent. You know, intuitively most of it anyway, but it's just a nice, quick tutorial in the art of reading and enjoying a book.

Of course, I read Mark Steyn's book America Alone. He's an engaging writer, funny as heck, and his insights inspire contemplation. It's a great book for a political junkie.

I finally finished The 48 Laws of Power which should be on every leader's desk. Business people will enjoy it. It's a good bathroom book, in that the lessons are broken down. A business person could get a daily dose of Machiavellian wisdom.

Again, for understanding how Islamism is changing London, I read Londonistan. Short take: London has changed and the change isn't good.

Because women's issues as it relates to child bearing interests me, and because I think the way the medical system approaches pregnant women and their partners is completely whacked, I read Naomi Wolf's book Misconceptions. Meh. It was okay. She lays out well the experience of typical birth and why it can be so traumatizing for a self-aware, intelligent person. Birth is something that gets done to you at a hospital. But, drugs are good.

Going through this makes me realize that I haven't done much neurology reading and that's different. Usually, I read something in the field. Ah well, I've read all of Oliver Sack's books except his new one Musicophilia. I did see a PBS documentary (PBS, I think) about what he's been up to lately and it involved piano players. I keep up with him because he is friends with Temple Grandin a woman with Autism who has revolutionized, single-handedly, slaughter houses and for the better. Because of her needs for calming, she translated a similar system for cows. She's a fascinating woman. Her books, too, are worthy reading. I met her and talked briefly with her at an Autism conference. Anyway, Oliver Sacks has written beautifully about neurological disorders. And I recommend any of his books. Oh! I notice that Temple also has a new book out. It's got great reviews. Hmmmm..... Perhaps a gift for myself.

A relative told me that The Secret is "the best book ever". Well, I read it and that may be a bit of an over statement since I can tell you in one sentence what the book is about: We tend to attract what we think about. Many people think that notion is crap otherwise they'd be married to a Marilyn Monroe look-alike. But there is a grain of truth in there--we reap what we sow. Do we know what we're sowing? Becoming more mindful of what we're creating for our life makes for a better life. There! Now you don't need to read it.

My least favorite book was Augusteen Burrow's book Running With Scissors. And the movie was worse. Maybe that was longer than a year ago. Anyway, I didn't find his traumas and abuse either endearing or funny. It was more disturbing and sad. Too much of that in the world. Don't need to read it.

I think I'd be remiss if I didn't include some of the reading I do online. My reading habits have changed somewhat. Instead of magazine articles, I often read online. Two of my favorites are Scientific American and New Scientist. Keep in mind, I have as much skepticism about the scientific realm as I do about the religious realm. One particularly egregious set of conclusions from research prompted me to write the authors of the study. I actually hope it helped their research, because they were missing the obvious. My point being, that conclusions change in science but it's nice to see what's going on.

For on-line reading I like Popular Mechanics, too, but don't get as much time over there as I'd like. It's fun watching them blend stuff, though. And you should read this article men AND WOMEN.

Otherwise, regular readers know my favorite Bloggers. The Socratic corner gets a peek every day. The Experts get visited weekly, usually. I'm busier now and that's made my blogging a distracted experience.

Please share any book recommendations in the comments. And I know I've read more than this, this year, I just can't remember them all.

1 comment:

sandy said...

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